Frequently Asked Questions

 Q: What is the deadline for grant application?

For a detailed timeline of the entire Impact 100 grant cycle, please see the timeline sidebar to your right.

Q: What are some of the reasons applications are rejected?

– Agency requested less than $100,000.
– More than one application came from an organization.
– Service is redundant because it is offered by other agencies.
– Program proposed or agency is not viable or transformational.

Q: If we are not a grant recipient will someone let us know how we can improve our application?

It is our policy to not give direct feedback. Committee members change every year so advice other than general information presented on our website or at our Information Session for nonprofits would be misleading. However, we have started utilizing a Viability Checklist that will be shared with nonprofits not moving forward in our grant process, in efforts to provide consistent and objective feedback.

Q: We are a small nonprofit and very new, will we still be considered?

You may want to consider collaborating with another nonprofit that has a proven financially stable track record. However, we have had start-up organizations receive Impact 100 funding independently. If you have not had an audit, your 990 will serve as some of the financial documentation required.

Q: Can our organization submit different grant applications in different focus areas?

No, each organization may submit only one grant application each year.

Q: Will Impact 100 decide which Grant Review Committee will review an application?

No, every agency must make that decision independently.

Q: If we submit a proposal this year that is not funded, how soon can we resubmit the proposal?

You may apply again the following year.

Q: If we submit a proposal and are awarded a grant, how soon can we apply again?

When a nonprofit is awarded a grant, then the organization must wait three years before reapplying to Impact 100 for another grant.  The 3 year period for grant recipients to re-apply begins the year that the grant is awarded no matter if the grant money is distributed lump sum or via installment payments according to the terms of the grant agreement.
(Example: Nonprofit X received grant in 2007.  Nonprofit X would be able to re-apply in 2011. Year 1 = 08, Year 2 = 09, Year 3 = 10).

Q: What does it mean that you don’t cover “indigent care subsidies?”

It is not our intention to try to replicate services that are provided by the government such as, Food Stamps, WIC, and Medicaid.

Q: Can we include our brochures, annual reports, and videos about our organization?

When we do site visits, we are interested in all this information; however, in the initial steps of our review of the applications, these things are not taken into account so we will not accept these with the original application.

Q: How does Impact 100 pay out the grant money?

Impact 100 invests the grant money as a one-time payment or as a milestone payment (installments). A grant applicant may request either type of payment in the application. However, Impact 100 reserves the right to pay the grant in milestone payments if Impact 100 determines it is more fiscally responsible to do so.

Q: What is the period of time the money must be spent?

The period of time the money must be spent correlates directly with the project’s intended implementation timeline, but must not exceed three years. Our milestone payment policy requires that the recipient provide Impact 100 with regular interim reports detailing the progress of both the project and its budget while milestone payments are being received. Impact 100 does not have a maximum for when the money must be spent. 

Q: What are the 10 counties from which Impact 100 will accept Letters of Intent and Grant Applications?

Indiana – Dearborn
Kentucky – Boone, Campbell, Kenton
Ohio – Adams, Brown, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, Warren

Q: Does Impact 100 accept applications that are collaborative in nature between more than one nonprofit?

Yes. Collaborating proposals should meet the following criteria:
a) Two or more 501(c) or 509(a) nonprofit organizations;
b) Be aware and submit letters of support for the collaboration (Common Grant Application stage)
c) Engage one of the partners as a lead fiscal agent through which all Impact 100 business is conducted.

Q: If the project is a multi-agency collaboration, do we submit the financial information from all the collaborating partners?

If a project application is a multi-agency collaboration, Impact 100 requires financial information from all collaborating partners during the “Common Grant Application” stage of our process. Please note each partner should submit complete financial data for three years as outlined in the grant application checklist.

Q: Can the $100,000 grant be used over multiple years?

Yes! Nonprofits may spread out their award, and in fact it is preferred (but not required). The distribution timetable does not impact your likelihood of receiving a grant one way or another.

Q: Does Impact 100 fund current operating expenses?

No, Impact 100 grants are meant to be transformational. While the definition of transformational varies among members, we will not fund an organization initiative unless it expands programming or delivers services in a new way. An appropriate funding request for Impact 100 would be for services performed in a new way (innovation), more services of the same kind provided more often to their current population (deepening), or expanding their current service to a new population (expansion). Impact 100 would expect the budget to reflect such, which could include additional staff & their resultant operating costs or other capital requests.

Q: Does the Impact 100 website show which focus area past grant recipients came from?

Because grant finalists are put forth for membership voting without focus are designation (effective 2015), this information is not available publically.

Q: Do you have opportunities for volunteers that can’t donate $1,000? 

Our current membership structure allows women to either join as a full member by donating $1,000, contributing $500 (and consequently receiving a half vote at the Annual Awards Celebration), or being selected for the Young Philanthropist Program.

We also welcome “Friends of Impact 100” and are thrilled when an individual or a foundation wants to help us with our annual expenses (which are held to a minimum since we are an “all volunteer board.”). Although grant review committees are reserved for Impact 100 membership, we welcome volunteers on operating committees such as marketing, PR, web development, nonprofit outreach, and communication.

Q: How are grants that have faith focus received?

Impact 100 welcomes LOI’s that are programmatic, capital, start-up, or technical assistance from valid 501(c)3 organizations. We do not fund overhead requests.  Our funding cannot be used to advance faith-based programs (e.g. build a chapel) but can be used by a faith-based organization to address social issues.

Q. Are grants always for the same amount?

Our grant amount fluctuates every year based on the number of members we have for that year, yet each recipient in that year would receive the same amount. Each time we accumulate 100, $1,000 donations, we are able to grant a $100,000 award.

Q: Is there the ability to print out my application after my nonprofit submits on-line?

Yes!  Your Letter of Intent and/or Grant Application will be emailed to the Primary Contact and Executive Director contact information provided in the application.   

Q: What grant focus area receives the most grant requests?

A recent Wall Street Journal article featured a chart that revealed 52% of nonprofits in the United States have a Health & Welfare concentration and 19% are focused on Education. It is predictable that we would see a clustering of applications in those same categories; however, we have had grant recipients in every focus area.

Q: Will more consideration be given to projects that affect more than one county?

Our members are advised to look at the impact of a request. That includes both breadth and depth. What resonates with one committee may not resonate with another. We ask you to speak from the heart (and back it up with data) what the true impact will be to those you serve.

Q: If the most recent budget is not approved by an agency’s board by the grant deadline, can the “draft” be submitted?

Yes. For the Letter of Intent, Impact 100 is interested in your project budget and even though it is not officially approved, it must still be a realistic budget. Please note that the final question on the LOI asks you to confirm that your Executive Director and/or Board President are aware of the application.

Q: Do you look to fund only “new impacts” or would you consider supporting previously awarded impact areas (such as dental health/awareness)?

Impact 100 encourages all types of applications and if your program will change lives, we encourage you to submit it for consideration. Our committees have full control over who they choose as their finalist.

Q: Are committee chairs allowed/willing to meet with me to discuss prior year submissions(s) in an effort to improve upon our previous application?

Impact 100 prides itself on its ability to maintain a level playing field amongst all applicants. In addition, due to the ever-changing makeup of membership and committee involvement, any advice given might actually be invalid and misleading into the next year. Therefore we do not offer subjective feedback. We have started utilizing a Viability Checklist that will be shared with nonprofits not moving forward in our grant process, in efforts to provide consistent and objective feedback.  Nonprofits are invited to attend information sessions hosted at the beginning of each grant cycle.

Q: Is the Archdiocese under group ruling & umbrella 501(c)3’s?

The best way to answer this question is to ask you to investigate this with your staff. We are not well versed enough to answer specific questions that pertain to the over 7,700 nonprofits in the Tri-State region. But please note, only one application per 501(c)3 is allowed in any given year with the exception of group ruling.  In these instances, further documentation might be requested.

Q: Have you ever funded a capital request, i.e. bricks and mortar?

We have, many times. If you review our website (http://impact100.org/grant recipients/), you’ll see that Impact 100 was the catalyst for many programs that began when the organization was able to provide the foundation with our funding. 

Q: Who can I contact for more information?

Any questions or comments regarding the grant application process are welcome. Please contact us at Administration@Impact100.org

Q: To whom should project partners address their letters of commitment? (Applicable for the Common Grant stage of the application process)

Impact 100.

Q: Are there any online tools that could help me with grant writing?

– Basic Grant Writing from Merrimack Valley Food Bank, Inc. includes practical tips for researching grants and writing a proposal, including what actions to take when the grant has been received or denied.
– Grantwriting: Basics for Beginners, from grant writing expert Carol Geisbauer is invaluable for people who are new to grant writing.
– University of Kansas’s Community Tool Box contains information on almost every aspect of nonprofits, including a guide for writing a grant that includes an outline of the important components of a grant proposal. Check out these resources for more in-depth information and guidance on specific components of a grant proposal:
– The Center for Nonprofit Excellence, United Way of Central New Mexico, has shared how-to guides about the specific components that most grant proposals should include.
– Grant Writing Toolkit—Needs Statement will help you draft a needs statement, one of the first and most important components of any proposal.
– Grant Writing Toolkit—Program Plan will guide you through writing a program plan for your proposal.
– Grantwriting—Program Development, from Carol Geisbauer Grantwriting, addresses program development—an important first step that can, when done right, facilitate the process of grant writing.
– Samples of Grant Proposal Components contains a compilation of samples for each of the 11 components of a grant proposal. It was assembled with permission from successfully funded grant proposals shared on IdeaEncore for a series that appeared in GrantStation.
– If You Evaluate It, They Will Fund: Program Evaluation Essentials, a presentation from Cecilia Harris on Nonprofit Webinars, discusses the importance of program evaluation in attracting grants and foundation funding.

      
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